Thailand 01.01.2005.
Tsunami Disaster - Youngest British Victim - PICS : BY BRIAN CASSEY - story Susie Boniface.
Patrice Fayet's (37) scours pics of dead bodies displayed on boards at Khoa Lak searching for his missing (dead) 6 month old daughter Ruby Rose Archer Fayet and wife Samantha Archer .
PIC: by BRIAN CASSEY

‘After the Wave,’ a powerful story of hope and loss

December 26th, 2004. An earthquake in the Indian Ocean caused a series of tsunamis and the most devastating natural disaster in modern times.

The heartbreaking documentary “After the Wave” takes us back to the catastrophe that killed more than 230,000 people across 13 countries within hours. Directed by Amanda Blue, it gives you a unique insight into how forensics teams from all over the world came together in Thailand with one mission: to give every local and foreign victim their identity back.

It is painful to watch. Several individuals and families are telling their stories of how they lost someone and simply wouldn’t give up hope until they knew for sure that they were killed. Some never got the answer; some never stopped hoping.

This documentary gives the Boxing Day a new dimension. As well as telling the unique stories of survivors and personnel, it also examines how and why it was so crucial for the forensics teams to work together. At first, the different nations came down mainly to help their own citizens. They tried to sort the bodies by nations, which they soon realized was an impossible task.

“After the Wave” is a powerful and educational film that leaves you with the feeling of denial and disbelief. Through strong quotes and real, disturbing footage, we get a rare understanding of the events and work that took place on the Boxing Day and the following months. The extent to this tragedy was and still is hard to take in, and this documentary proves just how powerful and unpredictable nature is.

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